How to survive in a post-pandemic job market according to HR Experts

Following our discussion with VCs about “future of work” trends of 2020 we’ve asked HR experts to share their thoughts on the current situation. 

Between the new paradigm that remote work has been becoming and the loss of employment caused by the health and economic crisis, it’s less and less clear what the future holds for employed and unemployed job seekers. 

We talked with Kyle Elliott, career and life coach at caffeinatedkyle.com as well as with Mark C. Crowley, international speaker and Amazon best-seller author of “Lead from the heart”, who kindly shared with us their thoughts and predictions on the Future of Work.

Amid all these changes, how does the current job market affect job seekers?

 

Booming sectors are going to benefit from the situation. Both from an economic and people perspective.

“As a job seeker, it may behoove you to seek out companies where business is booming — online grocery, virtual education, social media, and the like.” tells Elliott.

The COVID-19 pandemic has undoubtedly impacted the global workforce and the future of work” he continues. “The world will never look the same again after the pandemic. Talent acquisition and management are rapidly changing on the employer side. Networking and job searching trends are also changing as job seekers attempt to keep up with the uncertain future of work”.

 Elliott’s clients -- primarily working in high tech roles in the Silicon Valley -- have seen less unemployment compared to many others. On the contrary, many companies in the Valley have ramped up recruitment and hiring throughout the coronavirus pandemic.


In difficult times, mental health needs special attention.

 

Making people feel safe at work will be critically important in all jobs — not just start-ups.” stresses Crowley. “But fears of survival will be on the minds of employees so being transparent about your business plan and challenges will ensure you keep talented people from seeking new jobs”. Keeping people feeling connected is also going to matter in the months, even years, to come.  “Working from home has already been accomplished” tells Crowley, “so many Orgs say, “Let’s just keep it going.”  But if leaders aren't staying in close personal contact with their people — and keeping people feeling connected to the team — they will inevitably fail.  Over-invest in people when it comes to how you spend your time”.

If you’ve recently been laid off, Kyle Elliott recommends to take time for yourself -- if you can. “This is especially important during the coronavirus pandemic. Taking time for yourself and your self-care will not jeopardize your job search. If anything, resting, relaxing, and recharging will boost your success because you will be in a better, more centered headspace”.

 He adds that practicing self-care and self-love will contribute to the overall well-being and will eventually be beneficial for job seekers to move forward with their job search. 

 “Companies are still hiring and interviews are still taking place despite the COVID-19 pandemic. Significantly, I have had clients receive interviews or job offers every single week of the pandemic. Every single week! Your search will be more fruitful if you believe you will achieve success”.

The pandemic can be seen as the start of something new. Don’t shy away.

 

You have to find and own your secret sauce” says Kyle Elliott. “Learning what makes you fabulous will help you to stand out from the other 250, 1,000, 10,000+ people applying for the same job. Ensure you have examples and stories to share that back up how you are the perfect fit for the company and the position you are applying to”.

 That being said, he recommends being strategic about outreach and taking the time to craft a message that is intentional and adds value, as we only get one first impression. 

 At Wanted, we recommend to “start looking before even starting to look” for a new job -- a platform such as Wanted allows you to anonymously stay updated about the latest job opportunities without the need to apply to any job. It’s important to maintain the bargaining power, to not be desperate and walk away if needed from a job opportunity. Knowing your worth -- even in times of crisis -- remains important. To not panic is also important, reminded us Mark C. Crowley, “my suggestion would be: don’t succumb to fear — or the idea that a recession is no time to start a business.  Innumerable great companies were founded in times just like this”.

 To conclude, Elliott reminds us that it’s critical to recognize that the job search and interview processes are rapidly evolving “Start getting comfortable with networking online. Be prepared to conduct interviews via video. And, get ready to accept offers without meeting the team in-person”. 

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